March 19, 2018: It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?


It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? is a weekly meme currently hosted by The Book Date. It’s a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week, and add to that ever-growing TBR stack

Hey there!

I did myself a favor this past week and deleted both the Twitter and Facebook apps from my phone, and I have actually been checking both platforms much less frequently. It has definitely done wonders for me. I actually got shit done. Read books, and reviewed one. Starting prepping for a new part-time gig I’m taking on soon. Made measureable progress with physical training. I even took the first steps towards finding a queer-friendly therapist (which is hard in this city). I’m not flying, but I’m feeling better. 

So, reading! I finished five books this past week which I felt really good about. Slump averted! I finished reading Speak by Louisa Hall in print ( I wanted to love it so much, but I think there were a few missed opportunities to really push the book into weird and cool territories, and there were places in the second half that over-explained connections to the reader). On audio, listened to Call Me Zebra by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi (witty, acerbic, and touching narrator) as well as The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo (so fierce, punched me in the gut). I finally read my first Ursula K. Le Guin book, No Time To Spare (totally understand why she’s so beloved, an amazing writer and clearly so badass). I also read Piecing Me Together by Reneé Watson in one sitting (it is an utterly gorgeous book) which has given me the idea for a blog post, stay tuned. 

I’m hoping to keep the pace up this week, and here’s what I’d like to finish: 

Before I wrap up, I do have an ask- if you have any favorite literary criticism books, please drop your recommendations in the comments. Need it for the new gig. Thanks!

Until next time, I hope you all have a wonderful week of reading ahead of you. 


ARC Review: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

34728667Children of Blood and Bone (Legend of Orïsha #1)

Pub. date: March 6, 2018
Publisher: Henry Holt Books for Young Readers  
Format: Print
ISBN: 9781250170972
Source: Publisher

Thanks so much to MacMillan and Fierce Reads for providing me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Content warnings: Attempted rape, physical abuse, death, murder, gore, torture, war themes, loss of parent, racism, colorism

Synopsis: Eleven years ago magic disappeared when the king mercilessly slaughters the maji. Zélie Adebola, now has one shot at bringing magic back and retaliating against the throne. With the help of her brother and the rogue princess, she must thwart the crown-prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. 

Every once in a while a book comes along that is so hyped you keep putting off reading it, and when you finally get to it you end up kicking yourself for waiting as long as you did because the hype is real. Y’all, the hype is so real. I’m not even much of a fantasy reader, and much less a dark fantasy one, and this book had me by guts from beginning to end. It was impossible to put down, so bear with me as I rave about it. Also, let us take a moment to appreciate that cover. Look at that cover. What a friggin’ stunner. It’s hard to stop staring at it. 

First of, this is an all-Black cast. All. Black. In the year of our lord 2018 we have an all-Black YA gritty fantasy novel. Typically, I shy away from gritty fantasy because they’re all-white and rapey, but this book isn’t like that at all. It’s brilliantly-paced, the plot will have you at the edge of your seat at an ungodly hour of the night because you’re unable to put it down, the imagery is lush, and the characters are so well fleshed-out. Yes there is violence and it is gruesome at times, but it is purposeful in the narrative and commentary, rather than as pain porn, which is such a refreshing change. Nothing in this book is present without purpose or meaning, which speaks to Tomi’s talents as a writer; it’s very rare that a 600 page galley doesn’t have the parts that one usually skims over (we’ve all been there, let’s not even pretend).

The world-building in this book is absolutely phenomenal. Tomi’s homage is to West African heritage, and she demonstrates it not only in the descriptions and settings but in conversations as well, all woven together seamlessly. The book is padded with descriptions of food, clothing, traditions, etc. it’s an absolute treat for the reader’s imagination. Her mastery comes through with her commentary on race, ethnic cleansing, and colorism in communities of color- how systemic oppression works, the horrors of police brutality, how people who are raised in privilege so easily believe the narratives fed to them, how their worldview is challenged when they step out of the comforts of their spaces, how the only way for oppressed people to become free is to claim it themselves. It is clear that Tomi’s taken inspiration from modern times and the issues affecting Black people in America today, and it is a superb use of allegory in the crafting of this book. 

Now the characters. The story is told from the points of view of Zélie, the rogue princess Amari, and Inan. the crown prince. Zélie’s twin brother Tzain is a crucial part of the storyline as well. Each of the characters have clearly distinguishable perspectives and voices. Zélie is a strong protagonist, and even though she’s rash at times, her heart’s in the right place. Amari has spent so long under the thumb of her father that she’s afraid to unleash he own strength, and is quick to realize how her father’s regime has harmed so many people. Inan is the disillusioned prince, who wants to believe that everything his father has taught him about the maji and magic, and is unable to reconcile everything he witnesses when in pursuit of Zélie with his entire life up to that point. My favorite thing about Zélie is how she doesn’t let Amari or Inan off the hook for their privilege, challenging it every single time. 

“They built this world for you, built it to love you. They never cursed at you in the streets, never broke down the doors of your home. They didn’t drag your mother by her neck and hang her for the whole world to see.”

(I just. She’s such a phenomenal writer. There’s so many lines like this that will make you stop and really ponder the inequality and injustice that the maji have been subjected to for years. Take that and think about what marginalized people are facing right now. It really hits you.)

Another thing the book does brilliantly is subverting some very familiar fantasy tropes. Zélie is the embodiment of the Chosen One trope but she’s never just fighting by herself- she’s always got people fighting that she’s fighting for along with her, which I think is pretty cool. No man is an island after all, and in a rebellion you need every person you can get. Like I said before, the book deals with oppression brilliantly, and especially for Zelie, who has to struggle with the potential ramifications of how the diviners will handle the magic that she plans to unleash. She’s aware that saving magic wouldn’t automatically solve all their problems, and there was still potential for a new wave of oppression to come in place. Then there’s the romance subplots, and without giving anything away, all I’ll say is I was so afraid one of them would take a route I loathe but it didn’t and I think that served all the character arcs involved in that subplot so well. 

Undoubtedly, I am so ready for the sequel (especially because that cliffhanger of an ending left me with many, many feelings). Tomi is such a brilliant writer y’all, it’s so hard to believe this is her debut novel. I’ve been following her book two updates on her Instagram, and I will be hitting that pre-order button so hard. If you don’t believe me, just go ahead and get yourself a copy of this book by any means necessary, you’ll be drawn into the fandom with me. 

P. S. Check out the fun quiz on the CBB website to see which Maji clan you belong to. I got Tider (I’m such a water baby). 

March 12, 2018: It’s Monday, What Are You Reading?


It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? is a weekly meme currently hosted by The Book Date. It’s a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week, and add to that ever-growing TBR stack.

Hey there,

I haven’t done these in a couple of weeks because I haven’t really been reading. Different parts of my body have been taking a hit one after the other in the past few weeks so I haven’t been up to doing much. I did however, catch up on Scandal, How To Get Away With Murder, and the new Queer Eye (which I adore so much), and watched reruns of Gilmore Girls (I know, I know) and Brooklyn Nine-Nine. 

Meanwhile, I have started working with a new trainer (who is so much more professional than my physiotherapist) and it’s been good so far. It’s so interesting navigating physical activity spaces as a fat person, but so far there have been no red flags. Sometimes the intensity of the past year hits me and I get frustrated by how I have to claw my way through the progress, especially when it takes so much longer to recover from things. But I’m trying not to dwell on the things I have no control over. 

Now that I have significantly bummed you out, if you’re still with me, take a look at what I’m reading this week:

That’s all I’ve got, friends. Drop me a line in the comments and share what you’ve been reading!


ARC Review: The Beauty That Remains by Ashley Woodfolk

29736467The Beauty That Remains by Ashley Woodfolk

Pub. date: March 6, 2018
Publisher: Delacorte Press  
Format: E-galley
ISBN: 9781524715878
Source: Netgalley

Thanks so much to Netgalley and Delacorte Press for providing me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

Trigger Warnings: Death of a sibling, death of a best friend, death of an ex-boyfriend, suicide, leukemia, alcoholism, mentions of drug dealing, marijuana use, death of a queer character.

Plot: Told from the perspective of three teenagers, all of whom have experienced the loss of a loved one. Autumn lost her best friend, Shay her twin sister, and Logan the boy he loved. They’re navigating grief each their own way, and are reunited by their love for one band’s music. 

I often hear about how people find contemporary novels formulaic and clichéd, and while a lot of it boils down to taste, I think some it also depends on the kind of contemporary novels people are reaching out to read. For skeptics of the genre, I invite you to give Ashley Woodfolk’s debut YA novel a shot. It tackles grief in such a profound way while delving into the many complicated and flawed things that make us so human.

The three main characters, along with the secondary characters, are all linked to each other via their connections to a local indie band called Unraveling Lovely. Autumn’s best friend Tavia dies in a car accident while driving to a party, and Autumn is racked with guilt because she was supposed to accompany her to the party and chose not to at the last minute. Her coping mechanism involves spending all her time she can at Tavia’s house, particularly with Tavia’s brother Dante, and emailing her constantly. Her grief seems immeasurable and she doesn’t think anyone else’s, not even Dante’s, can even compare. Shay’s left ‘twinless’ after losing her sister Sasha, who’d succumbed to the leukemia she’d been suffering with since the age of 11. The twins, along with a couple of their friends run a music reviewing blog, and Sasha is constantly reminded of Shay from every queued blog post, and every time someone else, including their mother, looks at her. Like Autumn, she’s in place where she feels nobody can possibly understand what she’s going through. Logan struggles with grief and guilt over the loss of his ex-boyfriend Bram, and blames himself for some things he said to him as their relationship was ending. He feels responsible and struggles with a lot of “what ifs”, wondering if he’d contributed to Bram’s depression and consequent death by suicide. Logan’s depression lead him to alcoholism that resulted in the breaking up of Unraveling Lovely, of which he was a member. Now, he harbors resentment for Bram’s girlfriend Yara and leans on watching Bram’s vlogs as he grieves for the person he loves. 

The three teens are narrators of their own stories, and while their losses are separate, their grief brings them together. As the stories develop, we’re shown how their lives overlap and intersect. They each lean on their love for music, even when sometimes it doesn’t seem enough. This is a poignant thread that ties together all of them and the book itself, as the characters otherwise don’t have anything else holding them together. However, the story in itself such an emotional and captivating one, and I think these connections, fragile as they are, just speak to how grieving can be both an individual and universal experience all at once. 

The writing style in itself is pretty simplistic- lots of short sentences with strong, distinguishable narrators. I thought this worked well for a story that was fraught with so many emotions and the writing didn’t distract from that. In the end, you’re not left with characters that are completely healed with all their issues resolved and closure experienced, rather, you’re shown the significant effects of the tiny steps taken towards the beginnings of their healing process, with the help of good and necessary support systems. These strong themes of love, loss, pain, and hope will surely resonate with the book’s target audience, many of whom need books like these to feel a little less alone as they navigate a complicated world and tumultuous emotional spaces. 

Overall, a phenomenally strong debut offering a perspective on grief that stays with you even after you’ve finished reading the book. If you’ve known me a while you know that I inhale stories that tackle grief, loss, and pain, especially realistic stories, so this book was tailor-made for me and has officially made it high up the favorites-of-2018 list. Fans of Adam Silvera and Nina LaCour, consider this me shoving this book in your hands.